Category Archives: Ongoing

First Prize: ASFPM Student Paper Competition

This is an update to my earlier post on being named a semi-finalist for the ASFPM 2019 Conference Student Paper Competition.  I wrote a paper with Jordan Branham entitled “Disaster Exposure and Migration: The Impact of Major and Minor Flood Events on Population Loss.” I presented the paper on Tuesday, and, today, was awarded first place for this work.

See more about the final paper here!

Impacts of the Government Shutdown on HUD Programs: Blog Post

I wrote a new blog post for Carolina Angles on the impact of the government shutdown on HUD programs, with an emphasis on the impact in North Carolina. An excerpt is included below:

On January 4th, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) released a memorandum intended to explain how payments will proceed to Assisted Property Owners who provide affordable housing units to families across the United States. They assured owners that, while the Department’s spending authority expired on December 21st, interim activities would continue for the first thirty business days. This would include payments for Section 8 contracts, rent supplement contracts, Section 236 agreements, and Project Rental Assistance Contracts (PRAC), among others, “on an as needed basis to ensure ongoing viability of assets and preservation of affordable housing…contingent on budget authority being available from prior year appropriations or recaptures.” It was not immediately clear if or how that would continue past the thirty-day mark, possibly because, at that time, it seemed unlikely we would surpass it [1].

Read more at Carolina Angles

Photo credit: Joseph Prezioso / AFP / Getty Images

Planning for 36 Hours in New Orleans, LA: Blog Post

Recently, I established a quick travel series for the Carolina Angles planning blog, which gives a quick look at fun haunts from the perspective of planning students and professionals. To kick off the series, I wrote a post on New Orleans, LA, where I lived for multiple years during my undergraduate education. An excerpt is included below:

About the series: Welcome to our ongoing travel series. These are all posts written by planning students and professionals about what to do in a given city when looking for Brunch, a Brew, or a good idea on a Budget. To cap it all off, we include a fun planning fact!

About the visit: I lived in New Orleans for five years during my undergraduate program and absolutely fell in love with this city. I can never go back as often as I like, but recently returned for a friend’s wedding. Here are some of my favorite haunts and top recommendations

Read more at Carolina Angles

ACSP 2018: Presenter

I presented on a topic that looked at how repeat events were related to disaster exposure.

There are communities inland within North Carolina that are inherently vulnerable. As climate change progresses, they will be at risk of disaster events with increasing frequency. Due to this, and due to vulnerable development, some of these communities will become obsolete, and their citizens will become climate refugees.

In the context of Hurricane Matthew: we have some understanding on why communities, and the individuals within them, choose to pursue buyout
programs. However, our understanding of why individuals mitigate in place is less certain. But, it is quite possible that physical characteristics of place, particularly the natural characteristics of the towns, play a significant role.

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Modern Conspiracy: Panelist

Piscataway Park was the first park in the nation established to conserve a viewshed. It is across the Potomac River from Mount Vernon, George Washington’s ancestral home, and was protect the view from his porch, so that it might maintain the look of the region familiar to his time and era. It also encompasses an area known as the Moyaone Reserve, a semi-planned community with restrictive planning regulations, designed to safeguard a

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Resilient Design Education Report: Contributor

The Resilient Design Education Report: Current and Emerging Curricula in the Colleges and Universities was an analysis on how resilient design is taught, and how widespread the tutelage of this sub-field is. The study focused on five design-based disciplines: architecture, building sciences, engineering, landscape architecture, and planning. It utilized a structured internet search, key informant interviews, and five case studies of programs that focused on resilient design education. 

Carolina Angles: Head Editor

The Carolina Planning Journal (CPJ), based out of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill’s Department of City and Regional Planning, is the oldest student-run planning journal in the country, with over four decades of history. It is designed and developed to share the work of practitioners, academics, and advanced students and to further conversations around planning locally as well as globally.

It is run in conjuncture with Carolina Angles, an associated blog providing regular updates of planning thoughts that range from serious to silly. It was developed to allow for quicker reactions to ongoing events, to act as a platform to amplify the thoughts of students and professionals alike, and to reach out to and engage a broader audience. I have been on the editorial board for both the blog and the journal since I began by PhD. Now, I am transitioning to the head editor of the Carolina Angles blog.

 

Finding Your New Favorite Bike Ride: Blog Post

I recently authored a blog post for Carolina Angles on planning new bike rides to take using online tools, such as the Strava Heatmap. An excerpt is included below:

Somewhere in the relief of cooler weather, the urgency of shortening days, and the beauty of the coming fall, is the drive to find a gradual slope and smooth descent. The only thing left to do is plan the ride. As a regular cyclist and a new North Carolinian, I looked through some of the tools I’ve previously used to plan new routes to see what they said about biking opportunities nearby. These are methods that can be used across the country for finding good local biking, or for getting more information to plan larger trips.

Read more at Carolina Angles